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her book "nixon off the record" with brian lamb in 1996. it is based on her reporting's of conversations the former president had with her and others while she was his assistant from 1990 until his death in 1994. she relayed his opinions on various leaders and issues and what she learned about nixon as a private individual rather than a public figure. it's about an hour. c-span: monica crowley, author of "nixon off the record," is there a particular moment in your four years with richard nixon that you might remember more than others? >> guest: well, there actually is one memory that jumps out at me that really illustrates the kind of person he was and the nixon i knew. it was a memory that was formed at the famous nixon policy conference held in washington in march of 1993, and this was the conference around which nixon's very public criticism of president bush's handling of the russian transition from communism to democracy had swirled. nixon had written a very scathing memorandum criticizing the administration's handling of that transition, and he criticized it as "
of the first lady. this is just over 50 minutes. >> welcome to the richard nixon presidential library museum. my name is paul wormser and the exact give director of the library. i appreciate all of you coming to one of our continuing talks and presentations. today we are very fortunate to have the leading scholar on pat nixon who 100 years ago this year. mary brennan, who did much of the research year is the chair of the department of history at the university of texas. her specialty is post-world war ii conservative movement to debate three different books. turning right in the 60s conservator capture of the gop, weiss and others, conservative women in the crusade against communism and of course the book with a bus around here which is "pat nixon: embattled first lady." her book is an outstanding work and i would like to help me welcome her out onto the stage to talk about her work. [applause] thank you, paul. it's such a great honor to be back at the nixon library. i did much of my research year and i feel very close to all of the people here because they were so helpful to me in learning
>> in her book, "pat nixon," mary brennan discusses her use of mrs. nixon's recently reduced private documents. this is just over 15 minutes. >> welcome to the richard nixon presidential library and museum. my name is paul wormser and i'm acting director of the library. i appreciate all of you coming to one of our continuing author top presentations. today we are very fortunate to have really the leading scholar on pat nixon, who was by the way born 100 years ago this year. mary brennan, who did much of her research year for her book is the chair of the department of history at the university of texas in san marcos. her specialty is post-world war ii conservative movement and she has written to date three different books. there's been turning right at the 16th conservator capture of the gop, wise mothers and the red minute, conservative with them after women in the crusade against communism. in the book we loved most, "pat nixon: embattled first lady." her book is an outstanding work and i look forward -- i would like you to help me welcome her out onto the stage to talk about her wo
book, "pat nixon", mary brennan discusses the use of mrs. nixon's private documents. this is just over 60 minutes. >> welcome. i'm the acting director of the library and i appreciate all of you coming to our continuing author copies and patience. today, we are very fortunate to have the leading scholar on pat nixon was 100 years ago this year. mary brennan, who did much of her research here for her book is the chair of the department at the university of texas in san marcos. her specialty is post-world war ii conservative movements and she has written to date three different books. conservative women and the crusade against communism and book that we love most is pat nixon, the embattled first lady. her book is an outstanding work and i look forward and would like you to help me welcome her to talk about her work. mary brennan. [applause] >> ain't you, paul, it is such an honor to be back here at the nixon library. as paul said, i get a lot of my research here and i feel very close to all of the people here. they were so helpful to me in learning what i did about pat nixon. i would lik
on the market is "future perfect." mr. johnson, thank you for being on "in nybble welcome to the richard nixon presidential library and museum. my name is paul, i'm the active directer of the library. i appreciate all of you coming to one of our continuing author talk presentations. today we are very fortunate to have the really, the leading scholar on pat nixon, who is, by the way, born 100 years ago this year. marry brennan, who did much of the research here for her book is the chair of the department of history at the university of texas in san marcos. her specialty is post world war ii conservative movements, and she hoose twroin date three different books. those being "turning right at the '60s conservative capture of the g.o.p." with the wise mothers and the -- "conservative women and the crusade against communism" and the book we love around here pat nixon "embattled first lady." her work is an outstanding work, and -- i would like do you help me welcome her out to the stage to talk about her work. mary brennan. [applause] >> thank you, paul. it is such a great honor to be back here at
to be on the budget. and that was seen as a very good thing. in came the nixon administrati administration. shirley republicans would support the idea of getting the government out of the mortgage business. well, not so fast. the nixon people didn't want to let go. they noticed the president of fannie mae was ready, a democrat. he had been a big contributor to edmund brown. helping brown defeat nixon to become governor of california in 1962. nixon still remember that. [laughter] so one of the early dirty tricks of the nixon white house was finding a way to get rid of ray. nixon's housing sector was a fellow named george romney whose son mitt romney has been in the news lately. his dad complained that ray was not being very cooperative. he seem to think he could run fannie mae any way he saw fit. there was also talk that ray might use fannie mae postage or letterhead to raise money for democratic candidates. the white house was getting complaints from republican lawyers in south carolina that democratic lawyers were getting all fannie mae work related foreclosures, all those fees. well, within nine
and david brinkley reporting the kennedy-nixon cliff hanger. >> kennedy needs five more to go over the top. and could now be the state of washington. it could be california. it could be new mexico. it could be illinois. the odds are that kennedy will win. there are still some of results still to come in. if the present trend continues. senator kennedy will be the next president of the united states. >> the election may have been a close one. but i want to express and my appreciation to all of them and to mr. nixon personally. chris: finally, the return of richard nixon winning narrowly over shubte humphrey in 19 -- over hubert humphrey in 1968. >> election night 1968. nixon's the one. that's the natural banner for any sprightly front page tonight. richard nixon won the election this time. where eight years ago, he lost it. in illinois. it was so close, it took forever. but he won it. it was again one of the closest elections in american history. >> i have done my best. i have lost. mr. nixon has won. so now let's get on with the urgent task of uniting our country. thank you. [applause] >>
. there have been graceless moments. some in our audience remember richard nixon's famous post-california gubernatorial-- "you won't have nixon to kick around anymore." >> ifill: i read about it in the history books. >> you can argue nixon had the last laugh-- or at least the intermediate laugh. but, you know, i remember-- a personal story. i wasn't involved in the campaign then, but i've been involved with senator dole over the years. and in 1996, he really was not in doubt about the likely outcome of the election. and a very, i must say, eloquent concession speech had been prepared for him, which he took with him to the ballroom and basically tore up and just spoke from the heart. and in the end, that's probably the only way for gon respond to something like this. >> ifill: david what, do you think about that, this whole idea of the art of winning and losing and how it's best handled? >> i'd go with the eloquent speech. i thought john mccain had a beautiful speech. i think senator dole had a great speech. for both of them it confirmed their world views. they both had sort of
court by richard nixon, and in 1986 when he's nominated to be elevated to be chief justice by ronald reagan. both times the memos comes up, and both times denies the sentiment you describe, and you portray him as outright lying. do you think william rehnquist faced the lie, or was he just in denial as he got further? >> guest: i think he was in denial. i think he was in denial. the -- the situation in 1971 is that the hearing record is basically closed. >> host: uh-huh. >> guest: he's testified -- he's so slick and smart and excellent in his pairing of the questions, both in 1971 and, again, when he's no , nominaten 1986 to be chief justice. the senators birch, ted kennedy, joe biden, they don't lay a hand on him really, and so he's so excellent at parrying the questions, and the hearing record in 1971 is closed, and then suddenly, shortly before the vote is to take place on rehnquist and also on louis powell, up at the same time -- >> host: right. >> guest: shortly before that, a vote is to occur, but before that, the reporter for "news week," a really great guy, and he comes up, s
nixon is the recipient of the next award. justin says, in this enormously important book, rob nixon lays out some of the most persuasive and highly original analyses to date on the problems, perils and confounding paradoxes surrounding the phenomena of global destruction caused by rising levels of toxicity in the world today. while it is no secret that the most technologically advanced nations on earth, most especially in the west and most particularly the u.s., are the primary culprits in perpetuating the phenomena of global warming. little has been done until now toward the unique role artists, particularly writer activists, can have and have created in offsetting the dominant catastrophes associated with it. beginning with lawrence summers infamous quote outlining the logical necessity of the aforementioned ants nations capitalists, to dump toxins into an under polluted africa, nixon guides us through the surprising centrifuged of evasions, confrontations, revelations and is leisure surrounding various industries, corporations, governments, unions, villages, townships, preserves, rive
nixon overwhelming george mcgovern. in each of those elections on of the candidates failed to capture the spirit of the american voting public and the winner had the advantage of the weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won the second term landslide because of his huge popularity. however in many more presidential elections, the candidates are in a battle to present themselves as of one that is capable of serving the country with the winner walking off with a modest majority. in the work of the campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent would be either a referendum on the first term of the president or eighth judgment which candidates would be a better leader. is there a difference between the two considerations? the sinnott baliles giunta judging the leadership skills of the incumbent based on the effectiveness during the first term? this is the unknown and leadership skills of the challenger. it's easy to point to the national security or the economic consequential than practice on their ratings of an incumbent is the indicator of the popular view of the sitting presiden
and richard nixon, overwhelming george mcgovern. each of those elections, one of the candidates failed to capture the spirit of the american voting public and the winner had the advantage of a weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won his second term landslide because of his huge popularity. however, in many more presidential elections, the candidates are in a pitted battle to present themselves as the one best capable of serving the country, with the winner walking off with a modest majority. there is customary wisdom, a campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent will be either a referendum on the first term of the president or a judgment of which candidate will be the better leader. is there really a difference between these two considerations? does it not boil down to judging the leadership skill of the incumbent based on his effectiveness during his first term versus the unknown leadership skills of the challenger? it is easy to point to the national security or economic consequencess or consequent impact on the ratings of an incumbent as the indicator of the popular vie
addressed this issue. >> very strangely, richard nixon declared the war on drugs in 1971, but nixon, although he talks tough on crime, that is not how he made his policies. he spent two-thirds of his drug budget on treatment and only a third on enforcement. we ought to at minimum look at this drug issue with treatment. tavis: why we got away from that reality -- it is a health crisis first before an issue of criminality. >> starting with nixon, the successive presidents being tough on crime get them elected and also members of congress. and they are particularly corrupted by the unholy alliance that have with the corporations. treating with criminality rather than treating it as a health matter that should be addressed with compassion rather than draconian approach. tavis: the project is called "the house i live in. " the director is eugene jarecki. that is our show for tonight. thank you for watching. until next time, keep the faith. >> for more information on today's show, visit tavis smiley at pbs.org. tavis: hi, i'm tavis smiley. join me next time for a conversation with frank r
. richard nixon had been very eager to please the queen since their first meeting in 1957. when he gave her a book titled the art of readable writing, in an effort to improve her public speaking which had been criticized in the british press. nixon also hosted a stag dinner for prince philip in the white house which prompted barbara walters to scold him for not including any women. nixon and retained the queen's two older children, prince charles and princess anne for two days in washington even trying to fix the charles with his daughter, tricia. nixon had lunch with the queen ones at checkers, the prime minister's residence in the country, but never managed to get the queen over here for a state visit. his successor, gerald ford, for her ambitious tour during the bicentennial celebrations in 1976, he famously danced with the queen at the white house to the unfortunate choice of the lady is a tramp. which those who know her said that she probably found very funny. both the queen and prince philip enjoyed it when planning those somewhat -- as it did at the british ambassador's reception for
, but foreign policy -- nixon used to say it is always jobs, and that is what they were talking about. nobody cares about the environment, because my job is at stake. i am a coal miner, and if you have too much government regulation, i am going to lose my job. that is the fear they always played to. they played to fear of your security and fear of the dollar, and it works every time a. >> fear of terrorism. >> there are times the public has mobilized very strongly on public policy, and the vietnam war was one of those times. we know from nixon's comments he was obsessed with anti-war protests. if bush were doing the same things, and there would be much more protests. tavis: i feel like i am just getting started. i am glad we got to discuss this. we talked about militarism. tomorrow i want to get to the divide between the rich and poor. third, all these issues are approached in a variety of ways in this new book called "the untold history of the united states," the companion to the documentary. great to have you are. i will see you in 24 hours for part 2 of this conversation. thanks for tuning
. it was the first televised debate. tavis: i remember this. >> nixon had just come from the hospital. i heard it from the radio. i thought it was a tie. when i got to the studio i heard that cannady murdered him. tavis: the talk-show host is doing a new project, "larry king now," on ora tv and hulu. >> it is relaxed, very different from cnn. it looks like my living room. tavis: can i do that? >> i have hosted the show. tavis: >> we have -- you are hosting your own thing. what did you make of it? >> i think it was a wake-up call for republicans. the problem the republican party faces being very objective is to when the republican primary, you have to appeal to the tea party or what might be called the extreme right. to win the election, you have to be moderate center. romney tried to be moderate center. it was too late. they have to appeal to the latino voter. thougthe latino voter will be te majority american in 2020. that is eight years away. you have to make a better appeal to them. they may have just misbegun. they have to reevaluate were there. i do not know what the answer is. the tea pa
a speech after dinner so that she could hear the speech as well as see the president. nixon then left the hall to continue on to previous engagement. i use this the story to begin my top because i think several key points i wish to make about pat nixon and her public role. more particularly about her role as a foreign diploma
. 3 3presidency ii 1974.richard nixon the presidency in 1974. 3 presidency ii 1974.richard nixon tte 3&ppresidency in 1974. if... the... congressional commiitee... fiids the ggvernment... intentiinally.../ hid... news... of a terrorist who... should be held responsible?the... preeident?or ... ánoá... one... at all.?go... ... slash fox ballimore.../ eaalier weetold youuabout the fight ovvr legalizing marijuana..comments that barack obama made eight yeers ago and voter approval in cclorado and wwshingtoo state are putting new foccs on that d. debate. and its our question of tte day...is it time to legalize maaijuana? marijuana? jeffery writes on ourrfacebook page...."no. we already have too many idiots as it is." finest could concenttate oo s - our real problems." a biggresponse on this qqessioo so far....and so far most of you think legalizinn marijuann is a good idea. go to fox-baltimooe dot com and tell us what ou think. facebook. send us a tweet.. h - text your answer to 45203. enter foox5a for yes.. or fox45b for no. p3 you may e throwing out hu
's... neck.../ much... like watergate... was for... mr nixon?? nixon?? peverything is in hd hold bin caaled if... the... finds the government... hid... news... of terrorist attackk.../ who... should be held responsible?the... secretary of state?the... at all.?go... to our facebook page... ... slash fox - baltimore.../ think. ww're saying thankkyou to our us... whht you think. and... tell baltimoree../ slash fox ... &pbaltimoree../ and... tell us... whattyou think. p, 3 3 a baby's first and a youtube first. how a meesy diaper turned into the latest viral video. 3 a ppiest connesses to smuggling drugs. why he says he brought synttetic opium to his jailed flock. common sense... hey, look! a shooting star! make a wish! i wish we could lie here forever. i wish this test drive was over, so we could head back to the dealership. [ male announcer ] it's practically yours. test drive! but we still need your signature. volkswagen sign then drive is back. and it's never been easier to get a jetta. that's the power of german engineering. get $0
to this peaking question. dick nixon, richard nixon, he was a smart politician as they go, and he used to believe -- he didn't want to the run all out. you're exhausted by election day. he said you have to peak at the right time. he almost caught kennedy. he was three days late. three more days he might have caught him. humphrey almost caught nixon in '68. these elections go through rhythms. >> mitt romney peaked exactly where john kerry peaked in 2004, the first debate. they both had a first great debate, got a great bounce, and it dissipated -- >> slowly dissipated. >> -- over the course of the campaign, and they couldn't get the wind back. >> i'm not sure obama is peaking at the best moment, but the campaign, particularly in ohio, seems to have reached a plateau, this small -- >> why do you come with this debbie downer -- >> let me finish. >> are you irish? >> i'm jewish, close. >> dim scenario. >> if you look at ohio, it has narrowed in the last couple weeks, but it's hit this 4% mark and it hasn't changed -- >> let's go to -- >> obama steady -- >> let's go by what obama thinks -- not obama,
. unfortunately, lyndon johnson's doctors denied his request to meet the queen. richard nixon had been very eager to please the queen since their first meeting in 1957 when he gave her a book entitled the art of readable writing. in an effort to improve their public speaking. which had been criticized in the british press. nixon also hosted a stand-in or for prince philip in the white house, which prompted barbara walters to scold him for not including any women. nixon had princess anne and two children visit in washington, even trying to fix up his trials with his daughter, patricia, once of the prime minister's residence in the country, but he never managed to get the queen over here for a state visit. his successor was the ambitious post in 1976. he game this week against with the queen at the white house to the unfortunate choice of the lady is a champ. planning went somewhat awry, as it did at the british ambassador's reception for 1600 people during the washington leg of their tour. elizabeth was being trailed by tv cameramen with very big bright lights. when suddenly, this cameraman disapp
bush. he felt that baker resented the fact that nixon had bush's ear and baker wanted to be the sole adviser to president bush on foreign policy. c-span: what is your ultimate goal personally? >> guest: well, i'm not quite sure. i know that i'm working on a second volume of this, and i'd like to continue observing and writing about american politics c-span: do you ever want to run for an office? >> guest: i don't rule out any option. c-span: did you learn that from richard nixon? >> guest: i did, indeed. c-span: if you ran for an office, what kind of an office, of all the ones you've seen, appeal to you? >> guest: i think an executive position, perhaps governor. c-span: here's what the book looks like. it's called "nixon off the record," and our guest has been its author, monica crowley. thank you very much. >> guest: thank you very much. .. 80 degrees, big crowds here on the campus dade this is about ten minutes. autho >>> joining us here on the sety. is another author we want to introduce you to. this is bryan latell. co herself -- here's his book.roun. if you will start gi giving
is richard nixon in this? >> it's going to be fun. >> rose: what is richard nixon in this scenario, albert? >> who is richard nixon? well, he was -- >> mitt romney comes back? >> he was already president in '68 but the democrats went through the -- there was the john connolly wing nut before he became a republican, there was mcgovern, musky, so i think the -- it there's going to be the equivalent of that now. >> rose: john harris, do you have any sense of what the president -- has he thought about how he wants to ghovrn the second term or is he simply thinking about having an opportunity to govern in the second half. >> it's an opportunity. and the way to look at the mandate is if he wins reelection, the republican mandate to stop him he hopes has been eliminated. probably what he wants to do is take up the unfinished agenda from 2011. that is get back the fiscal cliff, force both sides-- his theory is-- to deal with the so-called grand bargain on fiscal issues. and if that's right-- and i do think mark's analysis is right-- the two central figureso watch on the republican side are paul ry
nixon doesn't lead we should play games of our national security. he believes in a strong america. to negotiate for peace from strength. >> that is why there is such a memorable image. we see these little plastic toys, and nixon is on a real battleship. we have aircraft carriers now in an airplane landing -- but it only seems to work when the incumbent does not. but this idea that the democrats are going to cut all of these important defense programs, it is exactly the same message of this advertisement, it is one the most effective attack ads. >> he opposed new aircraft carriers and anti-satellite weapons. he opposed all of this. he opposed the ground emergency warning system against an attack. now he wants to be our commander in chief. america can afford that risk. >> poor michael dukakis. if you do a google image search, this is how people remember michael dukakis. it was unfortunate for the opportunity. this was a photo opportunity that was staged by the dukakis campaign. he didn't quite look the way he was intended to. but you have the same message. he is going to cut all of
of honor by president nixon in may 1974 your heroic actions. in looking back, how did the training you receive help you have the courage to take the heroic action you took that day? >> the defining moment was witnessing the young americans that i was certain with. and understanding the intensity. the head into companies up until that point. they had been wiped out. this is a thing that i remember most about that particular battle. the thing that i liked it is back morning we had a company totally pinned down. later we found that there were 10 vietnamese in that area. i had 180 marines. we had to go across a rice patty that was totally open to help rescue that particular company. at 5:00 in the morning, i tell these young marines to fix bayonets and we are going. there is no moment of the legislation -- of hesitation. there is no looking back. they wanted to rescue their fellow marines. i tell you what. that particular moment in my life, to see that happen with a 19 year-old marines, it is a defining moment in my life. how great and how lucky this country is to have young people here wo
to the facts here we have on the table. i love the atmospherics. let's go to this peaking question. dick nixon, richard nixon, he was a smart politician as they go, and he used to believe -- he didn't want to the run all out. he said you have to peak at the right time. he almost caught kennedy. he was three days late. three more days he might have caught him. humphrey almost caught nixon in '68. these elections go through rhythms. >> mitt romney peaked exactly where john kerry peaked in 2004, the first debate. they both had a first great debate, got a great bounce, and it dissipated -- >> slowly dissipated. >> -- over the course of the campaign, and they couldn't get the wind back. >> i'm not sure obama is peaking at the best moment, but the campaign, particularly in ohio, seems to have reached a plateau, this small -- >> why do you come with this debbie downer -- >> let me finish. >> are you irish? >> i'm jewish, close. >> dim scenario. >> if you look in ohio, it has narrowed in the last couple weeks, but it's hit this 4% mark and it hasn't changed -- >> let's go to -- >> obama steady -- >> l
of the ones to do with plumbing systems, but i'm going to talk a little bit, for instance, about richard nixon's experience of a meeting between the two of them. can you please describe that? >> only time that lbj was not doing business is when he was unconscious. he was probably dreaming about business at that time. [laughter] actually, the historian described him as always on the move. he was always doing things. even when he took a nap in the white house, which he did daily, it just turned into a horizontal working section. he worked when he was in his bedroom. he worked when he was in his pool. he worked when he was on the ranch. he was always working and doing things. seventy-two phone lines were installed at the ranch. so wherever he was, he could get on the phone and do business. carol mentioned plumbing systems. there is a rumor that lbj did business when he was on the toilet. well, that is actually true, he did it. [laughter] there is one person who was in the white house who was part of the white house council in lbj's later years, and he talked of going into the bedroom from which h
a nixon or bush or clinton were not on the ticket or some crazy statistic. that's bind boggling it think about. it would be the rematch right? if the 2010 giants repeated in 2012, i would like to see that with the clintons, obviously. >> gavin: but hillary clinton effectively holds the prospect in her hand for biden cuomo o'malley, others who might seek that nomination. >> with one exception on this, which is i think yes the field is frozen. i think governor cuomo is in an unique position is that in some ways he benefits from a frozen field, which is he already has $2 million in the bank. he is the most popular governor in the country. he is actually governing day in and day out in a bipartisan way and has demonstrated a real rapport with the middle class on trust issues. so a frozen field. in the event he should decide not to go. he could quickly put the money together. overnight he's in new york. if you're a politician from new york or california you start out with large constituency folks and organization. he is in an interesting position, which is in some ways he benefits--he could f
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 571 (some duplicates have been removed)